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Using Microsoft Word with git

One of the major challenges of writing a journal article is to keep track of versions – both the different versions you create as the document progresses, and to merge in the changes made by your collaborators. For most academics Microsoft Word is the default writing tool, and it is both very good and very bad in this. Very good because the track changes feature makes it easy to see what has changed since the last version and who made the changes. Very bad because this feature is built around keeping everything in a single Word document, so that only one person can work on on a manuscript at a time

Source: Using Microsoft Word with git

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Git Command ….

git init
git add <file>
git status
git commit
git push

using git bash
touch index.html
git init
git config –global user.name ‘frank kim’
git config –global user.email ‘fafad’
git config –list
git help config
git

git add index.html

git status
git rm –cache index.html
git add *.html
git .
git add -A
git reset

 

git commit
//remove comment, and make it like Initial Commit
git commit –m ‘Changed index.html’

git log

touch .gitignore add text log.txt
touch log.txt

git branch mybranch

to switch different brach.
git checkout mybranch
git checkout master

git push -u origin mybranch

git pull
git branch mybranch
git push origin master

//
git checkout mster
git pull origin master
git branch –merged
git merge mybranch
git push origin master
//

//
git branch –merged
git branch -d mybranch
git brach -a
git push origin –delete mybranch

create github repository.
git remote ***
git remote
git remote -v
git branch -a
git diff “Showing you changes”

git push -u origin master
git pull

Fast Example
git branch subtract
git checkout subtract
git status
git add -A
git commit -m ‘Subtract …’
git push -u origin subtract
git checkout master
git pull origin master
git merge subtract
git push origin master