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c# – LDAP – Retrieve a list of all attributes/values? – Stack Overflow

foreach (string propName in props.PropertyNames) { if (entry.Properties[propName].Value != null) { Console.WriteLine(propName + ” = ” + entry.Properties[propName].Value.ToString()); } else { Console.WriteLine(propName + ” = NULL”); } }

Source: c# – LDAP – Retrieve a list of all attributes/values? – Stack Overflow

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Setting And Reading Values From “appsettings.json” In .NET Core

In this article, we are going to learn how to read values from  “appsettings.json” file. You will ask why we want to read values from “appsettings.json” and what is there in “appsettings.json” that we would want to read it. The “appsettings.json” file contains configuration settings. This file is similar to the Web.config file. In this file, we mostly store global values so that we can read those in the entire application. But Web.config file is in XML format and “appsettings.json” file is JSON format. We

Source: Setting And Reading Values From “appsettings.json” In .NET Core

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Scaffold Identity in ASP.NET Core projects | Microsoft Docs

Scaffold Identity in ASP.NET Core projects 10/23/2018 12 minutes to read +1 By Rick Anderson ASP.NET Core 2.1 and later provides ASP.NET Core Identity as a Razor Class Library. Applications that include Identity can apply the scaffolder to selectively add the source code contained in the Identity Razor Class Library (RCL). You might want to generate source code so you can modify the code and change the behavior. For example, you could instruct the scaffolder to generate the code used in registrati

Source: Scaffold Identity in ASP.NET Core projects | Microsoft Docs

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Set up a single-app kiosk (Windows 10) | Microsoft Docs

Set up a single-app kiosk

  • Windows 10 Pro, Enterprise, and Education
A single-app kiosk uses the Assigned Access feature to run a single app above the lockscreen.

When the kiosk account signs in, the app is launched automatically. The person using the kiosk cannot do anything on the device outside of the kiosk app.

Illustration of a single-app kiosk experience

 Important

User account control (UAC) must be turned on to enable kiosk mode.

Kiosk mode is not supported over a remote desktop connection. Your kiosk users must sign in on the physical device that is set up as a kiosk.

You have several options for configuring your single-app kiosk.

Method Description
Locally, in Settings The Set up a kiosk (previously named Set up assigned access) option in Settings is a quick and easy method to set up a single device as a kiosk for a local standard user account.

This method is supported on Windows 10 Pro, Enterprise, and Education.

PowerShell You can use Windows PowerShell cmdlets to set up a single-app kiosk. First, you need to create the user account on the device and install the kiosk app for that account.

This method is supported on Windows 10 Pro, Enterprise, and Education.

The kiosk wizard in Windows Configuration Designer Windows Configuration Designer is a tool that produces a provisioning package, which is a package of configuration settings that can be applied to one or more devices during the first-run experience (OOBE) or after OOBE is done (runtime). You can also create the kiosk user account and install the kiosk app, as well as other useful settings, using the kiosk wizard.

This method is supported on Windows 10 Pro (version 1709 and later), Enterprise, and Education.

Microsoft Intune or other mobile device management (MDM) provider For managed devices, you can use MDM to set up a kiosk configuration.

This method is supported on Windows 10 Pro (version 1709 and later), Enterprise, and Education.

Source: Set up a single-app kiosk (Windows 10) | Microsoft Docs

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Carl Franklin – Blog – “Kiosk Mode” in Windows 8.x

screen with no borders, and always on top.

In your <Window> Xaml object set these properties:

WindowStyle=”None” WindowState=”Maximized” Topmost=”True” ResizeMode=”NoResize”

That only got me so far. That pesky right-swipe charm is always there, and there’s seemingly no way to get around it.

Turns out all that charm stuff is in explorer.exe, the Windows Explorer. That’s the shell that lets you run all your apps. It contains all the taskbar, and gives you all the swipy gestures, corner hot spots, and all that. All you need to do is kill it.

Also turns out that if you don’t kill it properly it will come back with a vengence. So, I discovered this little trick using a ProcessStartInfo object. I call this in the MainWindow_Loaded event and all is well.

If you ever want to restart Explorer after running this app, you can press Ctrl-Alt-Del, bring up the Task Manager and run explorer from File -> Run new task -> “explorer.exe”

Be careful, and enjoy!

void KillExplorer()
{
// Create a ProcessStartInfo, otherwise Explorer comes back to haunt you.
ProcessStartInfo TaskKillPSI = new ProcessStartInfo(“taskkill”, “/F /IM explorer.exe”);
// Don’t show a window
TaskKillPSI.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;
// Create and start the process, then wait for it to exit.
Process process = new Process();
process.StartInfo = TaskKillPSI;
process.Start();
process.WaitForExit();
}

Source: Carl Franklin – Blog – “Kiosk Mode” in Windows 8.x